Modeling Trees

Here’s some advice on modeling trees from air conditioning filters.

Pirates of Yendor Sea Battle Rules

The indefatigable Jim Wallman has a new set of miniatures rules called “The Pirates of Yendor.” It’s for fantasy naval warfare, with rules for elf and dwarf galleys, corsairs and such. It also has an interesting pre-planned movement system using cards.

It all makes me want to get out my old Games Workshop Man O War figures.

Paper Model of Two Story Warehouse

Martin Gumbold offers a nice paper model of a two story, European “good shed” — what I would call a warehouse, because of the loading dock. There is no apparent scale, but I downloaded it and sized it up, and think it would work very well for 20mm, and pretty well for 25mm – 28mm figures. You could use it for a variety of periods, because there are no obvious things to date it.

Warhamer Star Trek

Next to The Sword and The Flame, Warhammer has to be the most modified set of miniature wargaming rules out there. As further proof, I offer: Warhammer Star Trek, a Yahoo groups project designed to use the Warhammer rules in the Star Trek Universe.

Painting Wargaming Figures: WWII In The Desert – Book Review

Painting Wargaming Figures: WWII In The Desert - Book Review
Painting Wargaming Figures: WWII In The Desert – Book Review

Painting Wargaming Figures: WWII In The Desert
by Andy Singleton
Publisher’s Site
Buy It On Amazon

As the title suggests, Painting Wargaming Figures: WWII In The Desert is a guide to painting the armies of British and Commonwealth, Italian, United States and German Armies of the North Africa Campaigns in World War II. Author Andy Singleton is a full time, professional figure painter.

Painting Wargaming Figures: WWII In the Desert is published in a perfect bound 17cm x 24.5 cm format with 158 glossy pages. the book has some 200 color illustrations. Nearly all of these are of figures in various stages of their “paint jobs.”

Singleton begins his volume with a brief discussion of the various “tools of the trade”: hobby knives, side cutters, files, glue, brushes and the like. A discussion on painting techniques, such as drybrushing, washes and glazing follows. I suspect that most experienced miniature wargamers will just skim past this.

The meat of the book is in the step-by-step painting guides. For each nationality, Singleton offers step-by-step instructions for producing figures at “conscript”, “regular” and “elite” levels. The ratings refer not the quality of the troops, but to the level of painting detail and skill required. Novice painters can start at the “conscript” level to quickly start fielding an army. As confidence and skill grows, a painter can step up to the higher levels.

In each step, Singleton includes a chart of suggested colors, describes which parts of the figure to paint and which colors to use on which areas of the figure. He also suggests brush sizes and painting techniques (dry brushing, for example).

If I were a beginning painter, I think this volume would serve very nicely to help me get started. As it stands, though, I’ve been at it for nearly fifty years and have probably painted some ten thousand figures. Still, I still gleaned some good information from the “Elite” instructions, particularly some aspects of using washes that I had not considered.