Dark Age Role Playing Game

Dark Age is an rpg set in 6th century Britain. Not entirely historical, it provides a nice infusion of myth. The author, Jon, writes that

The Dark Ages world is a distorted version of our own historical dark age Britain and Europe. The game is set in 610AD but things are not quite as they were in the real historical world. Major differences include:

  • More towns & cities survived the departure of Rome, so there are many urban areas.
  • Magic is much closer to the surface.
  • The power balance between celts, picts & Saxons is much more balanced, no single power has a significant ascendancy.
  • There is growing pressure from the continent, the Byzantine empire is not content to maintain itself but is beginning to develop an expansionist bent.
  • The Romano-British do not rule, but their great houses occupy positions of influence within British society.
  • Atlantis & Lemuria/Mu were real places. Atlantis and Mu were both magically powerful cultures who fought a great war. The magical remnants of this clash, tens of thousands of years ago, still reverberate through the known world.
  • Mechanisms are far more advanced than the real-world of 610AD, much roman and greek technology has been maintained and developed, partly with the assistance of lemurian and atlantean lore.
  • I personally really like games set in a mythic historical time. And I actually think that sometimes, mythic elements actually make a game MORE historical. After all, the people of ancient times believed in magic — and behaved as though it had an influence on their lives. If an army believed that toting out the relic of an ancestor made them more powerful, why not include that in the game?

    Arthurian Britain Site

    Inspired by some shield designs and banners I recently saw from Little Big Man Studios (is this the first time a gamer has ben inspired by decals — it may be), I’ve been looking for information on Aurthurian Britain. The Brittania site has some terrific historical information on King Arthur.

    1066 Campaign

    While nearly every educated person has heard of the Battle of Hastings, not as many know that it was the third of three decisive battles fought in a period of four weeks:; the others were Gate Fulford and Stamford Bridge. Had things gone differently, Hastings could have been fought between Harald of Norway and William the Conqueror. At any rate, this page has some good background and campaign notes for this critical period.

    Genghis Khan Website

    From a wargamer’s perspective, what’s not to like about the world’s greatest conqueror? Here’s a website on Genghis Khan with some good background information, including maps, biographical basics, and a nice look at Mongolia today. This last would be good for some of you doing the “Back of Beyond” games.

    Book Review: A Wargamers’ Guide To 1066 And the Norman Conquest

    Book Review: A Wargamers' Guide To 1066 And the Norman ConquestA Wargamers Guide To 1066 And The Norman Conquest
    by Daniel Mersey
    Publisher’s Website: Pen & Sword
    On Amazon: A Wargamers Guide To 1066 And The Norman Conquest

    A Wargamers Guide To 1066 And The Norman Conquest is one of a new series of books from Pen and Sword publishers that bring a wargamer’s perspective to critical periods in military history.

    Book Review: A Wargamers' Guide To 1066 And the Norman Conquest
    Book Review: A Wargamers’ Guide To 1066 And the Norman Conquest

    Written by veteran gamer and author Daniel Mersey, A Wargamers Guide To 1066 And The Norman Conquest interprets primary and secondary sources on the Norman conquest in “wargamer speak.” After a broad description of the events of 1066, Mersey begins the second chapter with a discussion of the various troop and equipment types engaged in the campaigns, equating them in standard wargamer’s lingo, such as “Elite Heavy Cavalry,” and “Medium Infantry.”

    The third chapter looks at the individual battles of Fulford, Stamford Bridge and Hastings. For these, Mersey offers brief descriptions from primary and secondary sources, and then extracts key points that a gamer should consider when developing a scenario.

    Chapter Four looks at broad themes of the period and how they can be applied to existing rules sets. The fifth chapter takes a look at some existing rules sets — both commercial and free — and discusses their merits. Chapter Six is a discussion of available figures.

    Finally, the last chapter offers five more general period scenarios for gamers to try after exhausting the fun of the historical battles.

    Throughout the book, Mersey offers some nice recommendations for further reading, and follows it up with an appendix with additional titles.

    My one wish for the book is that the battle descriptions and scenarios included some maps. While maps of Hastings, et. al. are readily available, it would have been nice to see them in the book with references to things mentioned in the text.

    For the newcomer to the period, A Wargamers Guide To 1066 And The Norman Conquest is a nice starting point. It is not a comprehensive history, nor a rule set, but it does offer a road map for beginning to wargame the period.

    Veteran gamers also may find something here. I have long been interested in the Norman Conquest, and have large collection of Normans, Vikings and Saxons. I consider myself fairly well-read on the topic, but still found a lot of points to ponder. For example, Mersey offers the question of what might have happened if William had landed much earlier. In that case, Harold might have faced the Normans with a much stronger army; the victor of that battle then would have needed to turn north to take on Harald. That simple twist offers two (or more) completely different historically plausible scenarios to play.

    I like the book and look forward to seeing others.