3D Models Of Dungeons and Dragons Figures

3D modeler Miguel Zavala spent more than a year creating 300 digital models of Dungeons and Dragons heroes and monsters and put them on Shapeways free for the downloading. If you have a 3d Printer, you want to check these out before a cease-and-desist letter is in the mail from Wizards.

Dungeons and Dragons Paper Model Buildings

Many moons ago, TSR / Wizards of the Coast released a series of paper buildings for use in D&D games. They’re now available free for the downloading. Any medieval / fantasy wargamer will find these useful. I think they’ve really stood the test of time.

How “Dungeons” Changed The World

I suspect that many of my readers — like me — "wasted" their teenage years playing Dungeons and Dragons. But it turns out that it wasn’t a waste. The D&Ders of the late 1970s and 1980s now are driving much of mainstream culture.  In the Boston Globe, Peter Berbegal has written an op-ed about this. A sample:

Dungeons and Dragons was a not a way out of the mainstream, as some parents feared and other kids suspected, but a way back into the realm of story-telling. This was what my friends and I were doing: creating narratives to make sense of feeling socially marginal. We were writing stories, grand in scope, with heroes, villains, and the entire zoology of mythical creatures.

Super Eight Footage Of A 1980s D&D Session

For the sake of pure nostalga, here’s a (silent) Super 8 film of a Dungeons and Dragons session from the 1980s. It looks a lot like the sessions I remember.

Microlite ’81 Tablet Edition

Microlite ’81 is now available in a tablet-friendly edition. The author writes;

The Microlite81 rules are based on the two boxed sets (Basic and Expert) published in 1981, often referred to as B/X. The rules are not intended to be a clone of the B/X rules, but rather a conversion of them to a rules-lite D20-based system that encourages old-school play without strictly old-school rules. Microlite81 is based on the third edition of the original Microlite74 rules.