Miniature Tower Defense Rules

Here are a set of rules for a tower defense game with miniatures.

The premise, according to the author:


You are the sole defender of a precious Portal which allows travel between worlds. Orcs want to travel to other worlds, because theirs sucks. They will smash down the gates and doggedly pour through the castle into the portal, if you let them. Miniature Tower Defense is a tabletop game inspired by video games such as “Orcs Must Die” and “Sanctum” in which the hero places traps to stop mindless hordes of enemies, while also fighting them personally. 

Blood Bowl Soccer

Blood Bowl is one of Games Workshop’s smaller games, but its been around for as long as I can remember. Here’s a Bloodbowl variant that uses the game to play European "Football" — soccer.

Jervis on Warhammer Ancients Battles

Lochagos, at the Lochagos website has collected all of the postings that Jervis Johnson made regarding Warhammer Ancients Battles, on the WAB Ancients List. Lochagos cautions that, while these are not official rulings, they do provide some insight into JJ’s thinking.

Pencils and Powers Game

Pencils and Powers is a solo roll and write game about dungeon delving.

Follow Me Men! Fantasy Rules

Jim Wallman has written “Follow Me, Men!”a set of free wargames rules for fantasy miniatures. Wallman describes these as “one brain cell rules”

These are rules for playing a wargame with toy soldiers. It is intended for several players – say 4 or more. Players control heroes (and, of course, heroines), who in turn have contingents of fighters under them.

The setting for fantasy games is one of a sort of mixed dark ages/medieval European environment. Recommended reading for this are the Conan books, Tolkein’s Middle Earth books and Terry Pratchet’s Diskworld books. There are thousands of heroic fantasy books, of course, but if you’ve read these you will at least know where the author of the rules is coming from.

Why ‘One Brain Cell’? Well, many sets of wargame rules these days are horrendously complicated, with big thick rule books to read, dozens of additional books to get (at unreasonable expense) and exceptionally complicated rule mechanisms that take ages to work out.

My brain is too simple for this, so I tend to write rules that one require a single brain cell to use and understand. This tends to make games easy to learn and play, and, amazingly, are just as much fun as the dense and complicated game rules for which you have to pay a King’s ransom. Odd, isn’t it?