Continuous Fire Fight Rules

The Jackson Gamers' have published the "Continuous Fire Fight Rules for the American Civil War. They write:

Robert Whitfield and Larry Brom developed these in 1984 after we refought the battle of Fredericksburg in 25mm scale, and the Confederates were unable to stop the Yankees by firepower. In these rules there is a �deadly ground� in front of an Infantry regiment (and to a lesser degree, in front of an artillery battery). Any enemy unit in that ground WILL be fired at until it is destroyed, or falls back voluntarily or involuntarily, or forces the units that are firing on it to withdraw.

The mechanisms of play such as Infantry and Artillery fire, Movement, Close combat (Melee), and Morale are taken straight from Larry Brom�s rules with little if any change. The unique facet of these rules is that once a unit moves into the �deadly ground� it will be fired at and will test morale, it may then return fire and the original firing unit will test morale. Then both units settle into a routine of firing and morale testing, till one fails morale or voluntarily falls back (or is destroyed). This is a difficult concept to grasp, because as miniature wargamers, we are so used to a turn sequence of: �we move, we fire, we test morale, we fight melees, we have another turn�.

Fire in this rules set is deadly. If one player persists in holding an exposed position, his unit or units will be destroyed by fire in one turn. Players must grasp the concept (so dear to the hearts of infantrymen) of bugging out if the fire-fight begins to go against them.

March To The Sound of the Guns rules

Herbert Wong written "March to the Sound of the Guns," a Napoleonic wargame that is a variant of Games Workshop's Warmaster miniatures rules. Warmaster is a generally good set of rules that borrows heavily from Fire and Fury and some other historical sets. Of course, Games Workshop would never admit that. Heck, they don't even admit that there is a miniature wargaming hobby outside of the "Games Workshop Hobby."

Here's an idea for a miniature wargaming scenario: During WWII, a group of US paratroopers, or British commandos are sent to destroy a V-2 rocket base. Of course, to do this, you're going to need to add a model of a V-2 rocket to your terrain. This website has a free paper model of a V-2 rocket in 1/32 scale. You could easily rescale it on your computer.

Airland War Rules

Airland War is the successor to Steve Lorenz' successful, commercially published Panzer War miniatures wargames rules. The rules simulate modern warfare using microarmor miniatures. You can now get Airland War as a free download.

Computerized AWI Rules

Will McNally has this set of free wargames rules for the American War of Independence. What makes these rules different is that they come with free software! Once the orders of battle are set up, the rules are run by a computer through clicking on options with a mouse. The rules run on MS-DOS, but can, of course, be run in a DOS box in Windows 98 or XP. If you're like me, and have an old MS-DOS laptop sitting around, this could be a perfect use for it.

I've always thought that there was great potential for using laptops in miniature wargaming. Even better: someone should write a program for managing tabletop games with a PalmPilot.