PulpGen Pulp Stories Online Resource

“Pulp” adventure is one of the biggest current themes in miniature wargaming. Here’s a site with a selection of classic pulp stories for you to read online.

Wargames Set In Lebanon

Given the recent unpleasantness in the Levant, it might be interesting to game a battle between the IDF and Hezbo terrorists — err, militia. Andrew Thompson has a page on gaming battles in Lebanon, including a painting guide, some VERY nice photos and a simple set of rules for playing the conflict.

It would be interesting to know readers’ reaction to this page. While wargamers have no compunction about gaming wars, a good many seem to draw the line at the more modern stuff … too close to home … too recent. Others, however, think that this is the most interesting thing to do, precisely because it is so immediate.

Band of Brothers by Stephen Ambrose

In this classic oral history, Stephen Ambrose follows Easy Company of the 506th Airborne from their training to the end of World War II. It’s an easy-to-read, compelling account of men at war. I came away from this book greatly admiring the men of Easy Company. This book was the basis of the hit HBO Television series “Band of Brothers.” In many ways, this book reminded me of the classic Cornelius Ryan works like A Bridge Too Far and The Longest Day. Ambrose has taken criticism for some factual errors in his work, but the reader must remember that this is an ORAL history, and the memories of the men involved may have dimmed with time.

Band of Brothers : E Company, 506th Regiment, 101st Airborne from Normandy to Hitler’s Eagle’s Nest

Mean Streets and Mean Villains 1970s Role Playing Game

Mean Streets and Mean Villains is a role playing game set in the 1970s world of high fashion cops and robbers, such as such as Starsky and Hutch, Miami Vice, Police Woman, Columbo, Kojak, Hawaii 5-0, Cannon, The Rockford Files, The Avengers and New Avengers, The Professionals, or films like Dragnet and the Dirty Harry series. It looks like a lot of fun, and there are even stats for “dress sense” and “coolness.”

The Spanish American War In Motion Pictures

The Library of Congress has an incredible archive of film footage from the Spanish American War.

This presentation features 68 motion pictures produced between 1898 and 1901 of the Spanish-American War and the subsequent Philippine Revolution. The Spanish-American War was the first U.S. war in which the motion picture camera played a role. These films were made by the Edison Manufacturing Company and the American Mutoscope & Biograph Company and consist of actualities filmed in the U.S., Cuba, and the Philippines, showing troops, ships, notable figures, and parades, as well as reenactments of battles and other war-time events. The Special Presentation presents the motion pictures in chronological order together with brief essays that provide a historical context for their filming.

It’s inspired me to get out some of my old Spanish American 15mm miniatures for a game.