Toy Soldiers Horse and Musket Wargames Rules

Toy Soldiers is a set of free wargames rules for the Horse and Musket period. The author writes:

Abstracted rules for battalion combats in Horse and Musket period. A unit is a battalion. A single player might have 2-5 units under his command but only one commander. The intent of the rules is to allow players to bring a small command to the table of generic troops with no points system or national characteristics. The balance that I am aiming for is that a cavalry unit = an infantry unit = an artillery battery.

Infantry battalions are represented by 6 stands of several miniatures. In 15mm, 4 wide seems to work. Artillery batteries are represented by 3 stands. Limbers should also be included.

Units and commanders will always have at least a single D6 placed behind them. For units, this represents their disorder value (1 is well ordered, 6 being disordered). Commanders will have a Chaos dice which will always be at least 1 (well coordinated command) and may go as high as 6 (Ineffective command control). Often, units will also be marked by a single red die marking their stress. Stress goes from 0 to 6.

Battles of the Winter War Site

The 1939 – 1940 Soviet invasion of Finland was one the least well known, but also among the most interesting of WWII campaigns. Here’s a site on the Winter War. It was also, by the way, the subject of a fantastic Finnish movie: THE WINTER WAR (Talvisota)

Tourney Jousting Rules

Tourney is a set of Jousting rules from the Lincoln Miniature Wargame Society.

Quick Napoleonics

Back when MWAN was still being published, it was my favorite wargaming magazine — in no small part because of the variety of interesting characters who wrote for the magazine. One of those was Friar Aelred Glidden, who is perhaps the world’s only wargaming monk. Glidden’s game rules were always simple, but interesting, and I very much miss reading his works.

Quick Napoleonics is a set of free wargames rules inspired by Friar Glidden.

Wargaming In The World Of The Difference Engine

James Clay has written a fine article on wargaming in the world of the Difference Engine.

For those who don’t know, The Difference Engine is a novel by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling that takes the reader to a Victorian world in which Charles Babbage’s Difference Engine drives cybernetic steam engines. While I did not enjoy it as much as Gibson’s Neuromancer, it still was a good read.