Sahibs and Sepoys Indian Mutiny Rules

Sahibs and Sepoys is a set of free miniatures rules for the Indian Mutiny of 1857 – 1858. Author Alan Hamilton writes:

These skirmish rules are intended for the small actions which were typical of the Indian Mutiny. Thus individual characteristics are very important. The basic Unit is that commanded by a named character who is usually of Lieutenant, Captain or equivalent rank.

The suggested figure scale for rank and file is about 1:6 to 1:10 with 1:8 a good average. This scale is not used for named characters who are 1:1. This is justified in the attitude of the period. They are, therefore, cast in a heroic mould. The unit strength was calculated inbayonets or sabres the officers, sergeants, drummers and so on being extra to this establishment. Thus a company at its full strength of 100 bayonets would be an Officer, drummer, sergeant or strong man (optional) and 8 to 18 rank and file; cavalry squadrons similarly have an Officer, bugler and 4 to 9 rank and file. The Rank and File can include a proportion of Corporals, Naiks etc.

List of Arabic Names

For colonial games fans, here’s a gamers’ list of Arabic names.

The Boxer Rebellion by Diana Preston

Diana Preston’s Boxer Rebellion:The Dramatic Story of China’s War on Foreigners That Shook the World in the Summer of 1900 was a primary source when I was researching scenarios for my Boxer Rebellion miniature wargaming project. The book reads like a novel, carrying the reader from one exciting event to another. While it doesn’t have the copious numbers and orders of battle so favored by wargamers, it more than makes up for this by providing dozens of raw ideas for good scenarios. Highly recommended.

Boxer Rebellion : The Dramatic Story of China’s War on Foreigners that Shook the World in the Summer of 1900

Queen Victoria’s Little Wars By Byron Farwell

This is a book that should be on every Colonial Wargamers’ bookshelf. It is a brilliant study of the conflicts and personalities involved in a continuous series of wars for the British Empire between 1837 and 1901. It is by no means an exhaustive study of the period, but offers the reader a good slice of the times. If you don’t already play colonial miniature wargames, this book will make you want to.

Queen Victoria’s Little Wars