Stillwell and the American Experience In China by Barbara Tuchman

Historian Barbara Tuchman won her second Pulitzer Prize in 1971 for Stillwell and The American Experience In China My copy is a first edition hardback, but this great book fortunately is still available in paperback. Using “Vinegar Joe” Stillwell as the catalyst, Tuchman examines thirty years of US policy in China: from the end fo the Manchu Dynasty to Mao Tse-Tung. The book offers insight to a number of military operations, from the Chinese Warlords of the 1920s to the Pacific War of the 1940s. If the movie “The Sand Pebbles” has ever caught your imagination, this book is sure to do the same.

Stilwell and the American Experience in China, 1911-45

PulpGen Pulp Stories Online Resource

“Pulp” adventure is one of the biggest current themes in miniature wargaming. Here’s a site with a selection of classic pulp stories for you to read online.

Battles of the Revolutionary War by W.J. Wood

In Battles of the Revolutionary War, author W.J. Wood contends that — contrary to popular belief — the war was won by American skill on the battlefield. To prove this contention, he examines in ten chapters, ten major battles of the war: Bunker Hill, Quebec, Trenton and Princeton, Brandywine, Oriskany, Saratoga, King’s Mountain, Cowpens, Guilford Courthouse, and the Chesapeake Capes. Each chapter features a detailed narrative of the battle, some useful maps and battle plans, and an analysis of the action. There also are some good organizational charts, and intellience reports. It was well worth the price.

Battles of the Revolutionary War: 1775-1781 (Major Battles and Campaigns Series)

Rubicon By Tom Holland

This is an exciting book that I literally could not put down. Oxford educated historian Tom Holland brings the whirlwind last years of the Roman republic to life — turning what normally is a dry recitation of names and places into a compelling drama. The machinations of Pompey, Cicero, Sulla, and, of course Caesar, are as complex and devious as anything imaginable. What stuck me most, however, was the many ways in which the last years of the Republic reflect our own modern society.Best wargaming bit: There are a few absolutely thrilling chapters that describe the rampaging Roman street gangs who, in support of one politician or another engaged in open warfare in Rome. It would make an outstanding game — especially when a politician opens his stable of gladiators, only to be countered by another’s private guard of legionnaires.

Rubicon : The Last Years of the Roman Republic

The Conquest of Gaul by Julius Caesar

Aside from being a great general, politician — and perhaps even a great statesman (his handling of the varioius conquered tribes in Gaul speak to this), Jullius Caesar also was a top notch reporter. His report to the Senate on the campain in Gaul in 58 – 50 BC is one of the great pieces of military literature. While some argue that the works are little more than propaganda pieces, the detail with which he writes makes me think otherwise. Caesar’s style is powerful for its detail, and spare. My guess is that he no more would waste words than he would waste supplies, or political capital.

For miniature wargamers interested in ancient wargaming, this book is a must read. It is one of the few first-hand accounts of ancient warfare that have survived to the modern age. Most other works are second hand, at best.

Hail Caesar!

The Conquest of Gaul (Penguin Classics)